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overincarceration, it is of tremendous value. we have states as red as mississippi and texas, going out and enacting reforms to into the house and foreign to those in a mississippi, and acted laws and expanded a parole eligibility, placing parole restriction on nonviolent offenders. to act as if you're serving a nonviolent offense, you can be eligible for parole after serving 25% of your sentence rather than 85% of your sins. those were projected to save the state $450 million between 2008-2012, and reduce its prison population growth by a very significant percentage. since 2008, mississippi's crime rate has fallen to its lowest level since 1984. kentucky is another state, enacted a law in 2011, and instituted probation for drug possession, reduced sentences for drug crimes and expanded parole eligibility. that reform is projected to save the state $422 million by 2020, and reduce its prison population growth by almost 19%. in 2011, ohio enacted a law that eliminated the crack again sentencing disparity. passed a series of measures to these reforms were so but unthinkable when i was litigating cases
of campaign to end overincarceration it is of tremendous value. we have states kind of as red as mississippi and texas, can going out to enact reforms but in 2004 and 2008 mississippi, for example, enacted laws that expand a parole eligibility and a limited their truth in sentencing law, placing parole restrictions on nonviolent offenders. they said you're serving a nonviolent offense you can be eligible for parole after serving 25% of your sense rather than 85% of your sins. those reform projected to save the state about $450 million between 2008-2012 and reduce its prison population growth by a very significant percentage. since 2008 mississippi's crime rate has fallen to its lowest level since 1984. kentucky is another state enacted a law that a limited pretrial attention for many drug offenses including marijuana possession, and instituted probation for drug possession have reduced sentences for -- that reform is projected to save the state $422 million by 2020 and reduce its prison population growth by almost 19%. in ohio, in 2011, ohio and acted a lot about a limited crack cocaine sent
out of mississippi and other places. it was happening right there in georgia. we were at the courthouse that night, standing -- because they war counting the paper ballots and we were watching them count the ballots, and out of the back room the gator walked past us and spoke. then he realized after walking a few feet away he had just spoken to sheryl sherrod. he was angry because we had been having meetings and my father kept saying do not put another johnson in office. so he walked a few feet away and came back and said, i take that back. i didn't know who you were. and so he is standing there, with a gun on his side, and my husband is standing there, and they are staring each other -- just staring at each other, and i was about to have a heart attack, because i knew, even with all of those people in the room, that gator was just mean enough to pull his gun out with everyone there to shoot. but someone ran outside and got his son, the one would was running for office, and then he ran in there and grabbed his daddy by the arm and said, come on, just leave that alone.
-ashbury clinic and terence hallinan organized in mississippi freedom writers on cole street. i would come home at night and was the university of the haight-ashbury. i had never heard anything like that and i was the first time i got the idea of segregated health care in the south. and we would go over to their office at 81980 and everything since hallinan in that mix was also eddie brown. so that's another thing about your book as there is this group of lawyers -- would testify in court cases for tony sir. nic was tony with tommy stories. he was this incredible storyteller. he was not good at finance. his idea he was driver car coming to so many tickets you want the police take it away. he never paid any bills. >> i just want to say when david called me up to be interviewed about the book, i said god, can we even remember that time. and it was a really weird moment in the sun and hunter thompson was night manager at the theater and i have lived with already mitchell and jim mitchell and david talbot k. mastiff he could follow us. i was actually going out. >> i was a reporter, not a stalker. w
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4